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INTRODUCTION

  • Apgar Scores

  • Body Surface Area for Adults and Children

  • Body Mass Index (BMI)

  • Cancer Screening

  • Child-Pugh Score

  • Cholesterol Guidelines and Management

    • Secondary prevention

    • Primary prevention

  • Developmental Milestones

  • Epidemiology Basics

  • Glasgow Coma Scale

  • Growth Charts

  • Immunization Guidelines (Adults and Children)

    • Vaccines used in the child and adolescent immunization schedules

    • Recommended child and adolescent immunization schedule

    • Vaccines in the adult immunization schedule

    • Recommended adult immunization schedule

    • Recommended adult immunization schedule by medical condition

    • Clinical considerations for use of COVID-19 vaccines

  • COVID-19 vaccine dosing and schedule November 2, 2021

  • Measurement Equivalents (Approximate)

  • Measurement Prefixes and Symbols

  • Performance Status Scales

  • Radiation Terminology

  • Rule of Nines

  • Temperature Conversion

  • Weight Conversion

Appendix update by Lydia Glick, MD, Timothy Han, MD, Steven A. Haist, MD, MS and Leonard G. Gomella, MD

APGAR SCORES

Apgar scores (Table A-1) are a numerical expression of a newborn infant’s physical condition. Usually determined 1 min after birth and again at 5 min, the score is the sum of points (0–10) gained on assessment of color, heart rate, reflex irritability, muscle tone, and respirations. Apgar conveniently stands for “Appearance, Pulse, Grimace, Activity, and Respiration” and was actually developed by Dr. Virginia Apgar in 1952 (https://medlineplus.gov/encyclopedia.html. Accessed June 1, 2020).

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Table A-1 Apgar Scores

Score

Sign

0

1

2

Appearance (color)

Blue or pale

Pink body with blue extremities

Completely pink

Pulse (heart rate)

Absent

Slow (<100/min)

>100/min

Grimace (reflex irritability)

No response

Grimace

Cough or sneeze

Activity (muscle tone)

Limp

Some flexion

Active movement

Respirations

Absent

Slow, irregular

Good, crying

BODY SURFACE AREA FOR ADULTS AND CHILDREN

Figure A-1. Nomogram for determining the body surface area of an adult.

Figure A-1

Body surface area: Adult. Use a straight edge to connect the height and mass. The point of intersection on the body surface line gives the body surface area (in m2). (Reprinted, with permission, from: Lentner C (ed.). Geigy Scientific Tables, Vol. 1, 8e. San Francisco, CA: Ciba-Geigy; 1981, p. 226.)

Figure A-2. Nomogram for determining the body surface area of children.

Figure A-2

Body surface area: Child. Use a straight edge to connect the height and mass. The point of intersection on the body surface line gives the body surface area (in m2). (Reprinted, with permission, from: Lentner C (ed.). Geigy Scientific Tables, Vol. 1, 8e. San Francisco, CA: Ciba-Geigy: 1981, p. 226.)

BODY MASS INDEX (BMI)

Table A-2. Body mass index (BMI) is a measurement based on height in relation to weight, and is closely ...

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