... Enterovirus infections occur most frequently in the late summer and early fall. Infection is usually acquired in the perinatal period. There is often a history of maternal fever, diarrhea, and/or rash in the week prior to delivery. The illness appears in the infant in the first 2 weeks of life...
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... A variety of different enteroviruses may cause periungual erythema; however, this is not specific enough to allow a particular diagnosis to be made. The most characteristic infection is hand-foot-and-mouth disease. ...
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... Enterovirus infections occur most frequently in the late summer and early fall. Infection is usually acquired in the perinatal period. There is often a history of maternal fever, diarrhea, and/or rash in the week prior to delivery. The illness appears in the infant in the first 2 weeks of life...
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... TABLE 194-1 Enterovirus, Rhinovirus, and Parechovirus Species Name Changes Made in Order to Remove References to Host Species Names and Approved by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses in February 2013 Genus Current Species Name Former Species Name...
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... Persons with congenital or severe acquired immunodeficiency, especially those with agammaglobulinemia, may develop a chronic CNS infection due to an echovirus or other enterovirus. Headache, confusion, lethargy, seizures, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis are common manifestations...
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... TABLE 12–2 Clinical Syndromes and Commonly Associated Enterovirus Serotypes a COXSACKIEVIRUS SYNDROME GROUP A GROUP B ECHOVIRUS, PARECHOVIRUS (PEV), AND ENTEROVIRUS (E) Aseptic meningitis, encephalitis 2, 4, 7, 9 , 10 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 4...
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... TABLE 199-1 Manifestations Commonly Associated with Enterovirus Serotypes   Serotype(S) of Indicated Virus Manifestation Coxsackievirus Echovirus (E) and Enterovirus (Ent) Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis A24 E70 Aseptic meningitis A2, 4...
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... For further information, see CMDT Part 32-10: Enteroviruses that Produce Several Syndromes ...
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... In the United States, 5–10 million cases of symptomatic enteroviral disease other than poliomyelitis occur each year. More than 50% of nonpoliovirus enterovirus infections are subclinical. Nonspecific febrile illness (summer grippe): Pts present with acute-onset fever, malaise...
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... Several distinct clinical syndromes are described in association with enteroviruses. Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is a unique enterovirus that shares epidemiologic characteristics with human rhinovirus and is typically associated with respiratory illness. Several clusters are reported from...
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... FIGURE 36-3 Overview of the picornavirus replication cycle. (Reproduced with permission from Zoll J, Heus HA, van Kuppeveld FJ, et al: The structure–function relationship of the enterovirus 3′-UTR. Virus Res 2009;139:209–216. Copyright Elsevier.) A diagram shows the steps...

..., or 34; or enterovirus type 72. b Since 1969, new enteroviruses have been assigned a number rather than being subclassified as coxsackieviruses or echoviruses. Enteroviruses 103, 108, 112, and 115 await inclusion in the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses classification. c Rhinovirus...
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... FIGURE 29-4 Cytopathic effects produced in monolayers of cultured cells by different viruses. The cultures are shown as they would normally be viewed in the laboratory, unfixed and unstained (60×). A: Enterovirus—rapid rounding of cells progressing to complete cell destruction. B...